Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Accreditation

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sacs
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Stone Memorial High School

Tennessee School Improvement
Planning Process (TSIPP)
For Accreditation Through SACS/CASI

 

Component 1a - School Profile and Collaborative Process

TEMPLATE 1.3 Collection of Academic and Nonacademic Data and Analysis/Synthesis

TEMPLATE 1.3.1: Data Sources (Including surveys)

Use surveys to capture perceptual data. Administer some kind of survey to all shareholders with reasonable frequency. Determine how often to administer your surveys by considering several factors:

  • Mobility of student families
  • Grade span served (if you serve only three grades, you could have a complete turnover of parents every three years)
  • Change in leadership
  • Change in organizational practice.

A school will rarely have each of the surveys listed here, but at least one survey should be administered and evaluated.  Common survey types include: Title I Needs Assessment, Title I Parent Surveys, District school climate surveys. Staff Development SACS Surveys (NSSE).

TEMPLATE 1.3.1: Data Sources (including surveys)

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Data Source

Relevant Findings

Cumberland County Department
Of Education – SASI

Student Population Data
Disciplinary Report

U.S. Census Bureau

Parent or Guardian Demographics

SMHS Historical Student Records

School Characteristics

SMHS Budget Worksheet

School Characteristics

Tennessee Department of Education School Report

School Demographics

Cumberland County Department of Education

Student Economic Status

Faculty/Staff Survey

Faculty/Staff completed a survey that requested input in the areas
of motivation, performance, recognition and culture.  The areas of greatest satisfaction include:  safety of the school, opportunities for low-achieving students to succeed, the open-door policy for parents, teachers, students and community stakeholders, commitment to school goals, and alternate course offerings to fulfill graduation requirements.  The areas of lowest satisfaction include:  consistent acknowledgement and rewards for behavior above expectations, communication with all stakeholders and tardiness and absenteeism interfering with student instruction.

Student Survey

Students completed an opinion survey that requested input in the areas of motivation, performance, recognition and culture.  The areas of greatest satisfaction include:  students have opportunities to participate in activities that interest them, students are challenged to do their best work, teachers treat students fairly, students have access to a variety of resources to help them succeed, and teachers hold high expectations for student learning.  The areas with the lowest ratings are:  substance abuse among students adversely effects learning, students are not actively involved in decisions that affect them, and the school does not consistently acknowledge and reward positive behaviors.

Parent Survey

Parents completed an opinion survey that requested input in the areas
of motivation, performance, recognition and culture.  The areas of greatest satisfaction include:  the school is a safe, orderly, and respectful learning environment, the school has an established and maintained commitment to learning and academic achievement, and the school equally recognizes and supports all students.  The areas with the lowest ratings are:  strong involvement by students in co-curricular activities, public recognition of student achievements, and communication between students, teachers, staff, parents and administrators does not always foster collaboration.

Community Survey

Community Stakeholders completed an opinion survey that requested input in the areas of motivation, performance, recognition and culture.  The areas of greatest satisfaction include:  the policies and expectations of the school are clearly stated and consistently reinforced, clear goals are set by the school and effective communication is made with stakeholders, and the curriculum of the school provides advanced level courses and alternative courses for students to choose from.  The areas with the lowest ratings are:  participation by the school in community service projects, the school web site is not as useful as it could be, and the transition for students that are not college bound needs to be improved.

 

 

TEMPLATE 1.3.2: Narrative and Analysis of Relevant School and Community Data
Some of the factors to consider in this narrative and analysis might be historical background, facilities, environmental and safety concerns, socio-economic factors, parent/guardian demographics, honors classes, unique programs, parental support, school-business partnerships, major employers, and any other demographic factor (school or community) of major impact, including major changes and/or events that have adversely impacted your school. 

TEMPLATE 1.3.2: School and Community Data

(Rubric Indicator 1.3)

Narrative and analysis of relevant school and community factors:

 

Staff Characteristics
Teacher                       Race  Sex   Yrs  Highest Degree   Certification     Colleges


Julie Arnold

W

F

26

M.S.

Math 9 - 12

Suny Brockport – B.S. and                      Nova Southeastern - M.S.

Scott Baker

W

M

7

M.S.

Math 9 - 12

Tennessee Tech Univ.

Suzanne Beaty

W

F

13

M.S.

Elem. 1 – 8
Math 9 - 12

Roane State Comm. College                   and                Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Pam Carter-Bergvin

W

F

1

M.B.A. + 18

Business, Business Technology, and Marketing

Indiana Univ., Ball State, & Lincoln Memorial Univ.

Drew Berta

W

M

16

M.S.

Math 9 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Marti Blake

 

H

F

16

B.S. + 36

Elem. Education 1 – 8, SPED     K – 12 & Spanish

Univ. of Miami & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Nancy Bookman

W

F

18

M.S.

Elem. 1 – 8, SPED K – 12

Eastern CT State, W.Virginia Univ, Western Carolina Univ., & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Dr. Janet Brooker

W

F

31

Ed. D.

Administration, English, & Psychology

Univ. of Florida, Tennessee Tech. Univ., & Univ. of TN

 

Anna Bryant

 

W

 

F

 

14

 

M.A. + 40

 

Chemistry         7 – 12, Chem., Earth Science, Physics, Physical Science, & Science K - 6

 

Tennessee Tech. Univ. &
Middle Tennessee State Univ.

Mike Buck

W

M

14

B.S.

Physical Education       K– 12

Middle Tennessee State Univ.

Scott Calahan

W

M

7

B.S.

Physical Education       K– 12

Univ. of South Alabama

Neil Capps

W

M

8

B.S.

History 9 – 12 & Geography        9 – 12

Roane State Comm. College, Middle Tennessee State Univ., & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Keith Cole

W

M

21

M.A.

Agriculture, Gen. Science- Elem.

Middle Tennessee State Univ. & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Carolyn Collis

W

F

2

AS/ADN

Psychiatric RN & Work-Based Learning

Indian River Comm. College

Marty Davis

W

M

26

B.S.

Elem. Education         1 – 8,        History 9 – 12 and Physical Education        K– 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Stormi Davis

W

F

28

M.A.

Elem. Education 1 – 8 & Language Arts  9 - 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Lisa Dillard

W

F

10

M.A.

School Counselor         7 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Lourdes Dunaway

 

W

F

36

M.A.

Spanish K – 12 and Music Ed.  K - 12

International Conservatory of Music, Julliard School of Music, Tenn. Tech. Univ. & Univ. of TN

Krista Ellis

W

F

13

Ed.S

Basic Business & Accounting, Keyboarding, Data Processing, Beginning Administrator   K - 12 & Office Technology

Georgia Tech., Univ. of Kentucky-Louisville, Lee College, Univ. of TN, & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Annell Fields

W

F

27.5

M.A.

Biology & Environmental Science

Vanderbilt Univ.

Richard Fields

W

M

28

M.A.

Elementary Education 1 – 8 & English          9 - 12

Univ. of Georgia-Athens & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Joe Goss

W

M

6

B.S.

Modified Special Ed.       K - 12

Roane State Community College & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Amy Green

W

F

1

B.A.

History 9 – 12

Maryville College

James Greene

W

M

3

M.A.

Biology 9 – 12

Belmont Univ. & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Jeff Hanlon

W

M

1

B.A.

Physical Education        K– 12

Cumberland College & Florida Gulf Coast Univ.

Marjorie Hanlon

W

F

9

B.S.

Math 9 -12

Cumberland College & Florida Gulf Coast Univ.

Ray Hawn

W

M

3

B.S.

Business Administration, Government, Business Education, & Business Technology

Middle Tennessee State Univ. & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calvin Kemmer

W

M

14

B.A. +18

Global Social Studies

Univ. of TN & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Lance Kennedy

W

M

12

Ed.S

Instrumental Music Education & Instructional Leadership

Univ. of TN & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Melissa Keyes

W

F

4

B.S.

Elem. Education K – 8 & Biology     9 -12

Roane State Comm. College, Tennessee Tech. Univ., & Univ. of TN-Chattanooga

Jeannie Kinslow

W

F

9

B.S.

Occupational Culinary Arts, Family & Consumer Science 5 – 12 and Music Education         K – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Meghan Kunzelman

 

 

W

F

3

B.S.

Physical Education K-12, Elementary Education & Math 9 – 12

Olivet College

Jake Lewis

W

M

1

B.S.

Exercise Science & Physical Education -       K – 12

Roane State Comm. College & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Scott Maddox

W

M

20

Ed.S

Math 9 – 12 & Administration & Supervision

Auburn Univ. & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Bo Magnusson

W

M

6

B.S. +

Professional Occupational Educator-Aviation & Criminal Justice

Tennessee Tech. Univ., Texas State Univ. & Laney College - Motlow

Tom Maltby

W

M

3

B.S.

Criminal Justice

Tallahassee Comm. College, Roane State Comm. College & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Terry McKinney

W

M

4

Professional Occupational Educator

ASE Master Mechanic, ASE Master Auto Machinist

Lincoln Memorial Univ.

Francis Mulcahy

 

 

 

 

W

M

38

M.A. + 90

English K – 12, Reading K – 12 & College English

Syracuse Univ., McDaniels College, George Washington Univ., Georgetown Univ., Tennessee Tech. Univ., Univ. of Maryland, Univ. of District of Columbia & Galludet Univ.

Amy Newman

W

F

12

M.S.

Communications & English Journalism

Univ. of TN & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Alicia Page

W

F

7

M.S.

Math 9 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Brian Parker

W

M

9

Ed.S

Math 9 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Joe Pennycuff

W

M

36

M.S.

Vocational Agriculture & Administration & Supervision

Univ. of TN & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Cassie Redcorn

N.A.

F

2

B.A.

Instrumental Music & Vocal Music

Berea College

Linda Ridge

W

F

32

M.A.

Biology & Physical Science 9 – 12

Radford, Univ. of Virginia, Citadel, Univ. of South Carolina & South Carolina State

MSG John Rowe

W

M

20

B.S.

Codes Command Army Instructor JROTC

Troy Univ.

Dale Safdie

W

F

11

M.A. & Professional Occupational Educator

Visual Arts K- 12, Elem. Ed.    1 – 8 & Printing Press

Tennessee Tech. Univ. & Volunteer State Comm. College

Blake Saldana

W

M

2

B.S.

Music Ed.         K – 12 Focus in Vocal Music

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Claudia Sanchez

H

F

6

B.S.

ESL K – 12

Univ. of Santiago of California                   (Columbia)

Ned Serleth

W

M

26

B.S.+

Elem. Education 1 – 8 & English        9 – 12

Northern Iowa Area Comm. College, Northern Arizona Univ., Univ.of Wisconsin-Plattville, Univ. of Wisconsis-Whitewater, Belmont Univ., Univ. of TN    & Tenn.  Tech. Univ.

LeeAnn Sherrill

W

F

15

B.S.

English 9 – 12

Tenn. Wesleyan College

Andrea Simmons

W

F

17

M.A.

School Psychologist & School Counselor         7 – 12

Univ. of TN & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Becky Smith

W

F

5

B.S.

U.S. & World History

Tenn. Wesleyan College

Carol Smith

W

F

22

Masters +

Elem. Education 1 – 8, General Business, Office & Clerical Practices, Business Mechanics, Business Law, Business English & Math, Bookkeeping, Typing & Economics

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Jan Smith

W

F

6

M.A.

Bible & Math    9 - 12

Lipscomb Univ., Univ. of Alabama-Huntsville, Univ. of TN-Nashville, Fisk Univ. & Univ. of TN-Knoxville

Tim Smith

W

M

24

Ed.S

Elem. Education 1 – 8 & Social Sciences 9 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

 

Rick Strader

 

  W

 

M

 

4

 

B.A.

 

German K – 12 and Carpentry

 

Long Beach City College-Long Beach, CA and Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Tommy Tatum

W

M

8

M.A.

Elementary Education K – 8 and Technology Engineering      9 – 12

Middle Tennessee State Univ. and City Univ.-Seattle, WA

Mitch Teeters

W

M

6

B.A.+

Elem. Education History 1 – 8 & Social Studies   9 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Kelly Tollett

W

F

5

Ed.S.

School Counselor         7 – 12

Roane State Comm. College, Tennessee Tech. Univ. & Univ. of Alabama

Kim Wattenbarger

 

W

F

17

M.A.

Elem. Education 1 – 8, Reading Specialist & Library Media Specialist

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Mark Wattenbarger

W

M

17

M.A.

Biology 9 -12 & Physical Education K-12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Billie Jo Watts

W

F

3

B.S.

English 9 – 12

Roane State Comm. College & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Dale Weaver

W

M

1

N/A

Carpentry – Construction Core

Tennessee Dept. of Education

Sheryl Webb

W

F

3

M.A.

Math 9 – 12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Pam White

W

F

19

Ed.S.

Elem. Education 1 – 8 & SPED     K - 12

Southeaster Illinois Univ., Southern Illinois Univ., Valdosta State Univ. & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Justin Whittenbarger

W

M

10

B.S.

English 9 -12

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Dorinda Wilhite

W

F

28

M.A.

Elem. Education 1 – 8, Food Management, General Science, Clothing & Home Economics

Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Wendell Wilson

W

M

31

M.A + 15

Administration & Supervision, Agriculture Education, Biology & Agricultural Science

Middle Tennessee State Univ. & Tennessee Tech. Univ.

Mike Yarber

W

M

18

M.A.

Social Studies   9 – 12 & SPED K - 12

Univ. of TN & Lincoln Memorial Univ.

 

Support Staff

Executive Secretary:  Jan Reed
Attendance Secretaries:  Sharon Garrett and Hellen Mullinax
Vice Principals’ Secretaries:  Elisa Guthrie and Jeanne Turner
Guidance Secretary:  Kellie Walter
SPED Assistants:  Jeremy Hassler, Cassie Mathews, Judy Phillips, and Peggy Potter
CTE Secretary:  Nancy Garren
Custodial Staff:  Gail Hamby(Lead Custodian), Brenda Hall, Travis Lewis, Josh Randol,
     Maxine Beaty, Bruce Smith, Susie Smith, and Vernon Farr     
Cafeteria Staff:  Flo Scoggins(Cafeteria Head) with a cafeteria staff of 14 members

 

Grade Distribution ’08-‘09
 
  9th        -          290
10th        -          282
11th        -          239
12th        -          208
Sp. ED -            09 (option 7)

Length of School Year

180 days for students, 200 days for certified personnel

Length of School Day

Stone Memorial High operates on a seven-hour school day from 7:45A.M. –2:45 P.M.  We operate on a 4 X 4 block schedule, with each class lasting 90 minutes on a regular bell schedule.

 

Operating Budget Distribution Equity

The finance committee of the Cumberland County school system determines the budget for Stone Memorial High School.  Monies received from state and local sources are divided among all county schools.  These funds may be supplemented by money from the PTSA, school clubs and local businesses and grants.

Allocations from the Cumberland County Department of Education/School Fees

Paper

7,070.00

BEP Teacher Allocation

13,000.00

Instructional Materials/Supplies(ADA)

16,740.00

Library Books & supplies

10,695.50

Office Administration

1,000.00

CTE Instructional Supply Allocation

20,000.00

TOTAL

$68,505.50

Per Pupil Expenditures

Department Distributions of School Activity Fees

Art

2,557.50

Band

   500.00

Chorus

   250.00

TOTAL

3,307.50

 

Administration, Faculty Demographics

Highly Qualified Teachers       -           34                                                       
Not Highly Qualified Teachers  -           0         
Exempt                                     -         25       
Exceptional Education             -           4
Total Professional Staff          -           63
Part-time teachers                   -           5   (included in total professional staff)
                                                                                                                                   
Credentials

            Bachelor’s Degree                                -           51%
            Master’s & higher Degree                     -           49%
            Industry Certified                                  -          17%
            Advanced Career Ladder Teachers      -            7%

Enrollment Data

Total Student Enrollment – 1,065

Total Exceptional Education Students: 

            Male:    88                                Black:   0                                  Inclusion: 87    
            Female: 34                               White:  119                              AAC:  10        
                                                            Asian:   0                                  Gifted:  25      
                                                            Hispanic:  3     

Graduation Paths
            Dual Path
            University Path
            Technical Path

 

Curriculum Offerings

Two hundred forty different courses are in the course description catalog for Stone Memorial High School.  These courses are offered for the 2008 – 2009 school year.  There are one hundred nineteen regular education course offerings; twenty-eight honors course offerings, ten dual course offerings, four AP course offerings, fifty-eight CTE course offerings and twenty-one Special Education course offerings.   
  

 

Unique Programs

Summer Transitional Activities             Advanced Choir
Trap Shooting Team                             Renaissance
Cumberland County Playhouse           Peer Tutoring
Teen Court                                           Dual Credit
TN Technological Articulation Advisory    JROTC                                           
Career and Technical Education Classes     School Leadership Team
Gateway Intervention Classes                        Credit Recovery
College Visits for Juniors and Seniors         ESOL                                                                   
           

Honors Classes

Honors Algebra I
Honors Algebra II
Advanced Algebra & Trigonometry
Honors Geometry
Pre-Calculus
Statistics
Honors JAVA Programming
Dual College Algebra
Dual Calculus I & II
Honors English 9, 10, 11 & 12
Honors U.S. History
Physics
Anatomy and Physiology
Dual Honors Biology I
Dual Honors Biology II
Honors Chemistry I
Honors Chemistry II
Dual English 12
Dual Spanish 3 & 4
German 3 & 4
Honors Economics
AP Classes
Honors Agriscience
Honors Aviation II
Honors American Business and Legal Systems
Honors Criminal Justice II
Honors Engineering II
Honors Child Development
Honors Forensic Science
Honors Visual Communications

SMHS CLUBS
           
Art Club                                               Beta Cub                                             
Bible Club                                            Chess Club                                          
DECA                                                  Environmental Club                                                       FBLA                                                   Fellowship of Christian Athletes                       
FFA                                                     Future Teachers of America                                          Garden Club                                       FCCLA   
HOSA                                                 Interact
JROTC                                                Math Club
Panther Tales Players                            Pep Club
Photography Club                                 Sci-Fiction Club
Spanish Club                                        Student Government Association
Young Democrats                                 Young Republicans
French Club                                        German Club   

Parental Support

PTSA                                                   TAD Center
Mentors                                               Football Booster
Basketball Booster                               Cheer Booster
Volleyball Booster                                Boys and Girls Soccer Booster
Wrestling Booster                                 Softball Booster
Baseball Booster                                  Bowling Booster
JROTC Booster                                   Band Booster
Leadership Team Membership  Choral Booster
Community Engagement Facilitator Activities, i.e. Service Learning, Caring Community                                         Coaches, Parent Volunteers
                       

 

The following companies are on Advisory Committees for the Career and Technical Education Classes

 

Delbar Products                                   Tennessee Wildlife Agency
Tennessee Technology Center   Regions Bank
Village Arms Apartment                        Computer System Major
Crossville Chronicle                              First National Bank
Buckeye Medical                                  Election Commission
United Grocery Outlet                          Good Samaritans
Cumberland Auto Parts                        Crossville Co-op

 

 

STUDENT POPULATION DATA

Number of Students (2008-2009)

            Total – 1,065

Student demographics (race, gender, ethnicity) (2008-2009)

Gender

              Male –     551 or  51.7%
              Female –  514 or 48.3%

Ethnicity

            White – 1,014 or 95.2%
            Black –      03 or     .3%
            Asian –      04 or     .4%
            Hispanic – 35 or   3.2%
            Native American – 09 or .9%

English Proficiency (2008/2009)

ESL Students

Grade

 

Male

 

Female

Ninth

 

6

 

2

Tenth

 

4

 

3

Eleventh

 

0

 

0

Twelfth

 

1

 

0

TOTALS

 

12

 

5

Free and Reduced Lunch Rate (2008-2009)

            Free Lunch
Total Students – 601 or   56.4% of the student body

            Reduced Lunch
Total Students – 212 or 20% of the student body

 

Students Scheduled in Classes without Credentialed Teacher

None

Attendance Rate (2007-2008)

93.8% average daily attendance rate
        

Student Discipline


Suspensions & Expulsions

 

 

# Suspensions

% Suspensions

# Expulsions

% Expulsions

African American

1

50.0

0

0.0

Asian / Pacific Islander

1

20.0

0

0.0

Hispanic

7

17.9

1

2.6

Native American

2

66.7

0

0.0

White

73

7.3

21

2.1

Female

27

5.4

4

0.8

Male

57

10.4

18

3.3

All Students - TOTALS

84

8.0

22

2.1

 

( * ) = Data suppressed due to student N count

( - ) = Not Applicable or Not Available

( >95 ) = Result is >95%

( <5 ) = Result is <5%

 

 

Retention Rate (2007-2008)

            Total failure rate – 30 students from grades 9 - 12

            Failure rate by grade

                        Ninth –      6 or  2%
                        Tenth –    16 or  6%
                        Eleventh – 8 or  4%
                        Twelfth –  0 or   0%

 

Dropout rate (2007-2008)

 

 

Drop-outs under 18

Drop-outs over 18

TOTALS

Ninth

 

01

 

 

02

 

03

Tenth

 

03

 

 

05

 

08

Eleventh

 

01

 

 

08

 

09

Twelfth

 

0

 

 

06

 

06

TOTALS

 

05

 

 

21

 

26

 

 

Graduation Rate

Attendance, Promotion, Dropout, and Graduation

 

Grades K-8 Non-Academic Indicators

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

2007

2008

State Goal

Attendance Rate(%) (Grade N not included)

-

-

-

93.0

Promotion Rate(%)

99.0

-

-

97.0

 

Grades 9-12 Non-Academic Indicators

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2006

2007

2008

State Goal

Attendance Rate(%) (Grade N not included)

-

93.8

93.8

93.0

Cohort Dropout (%)

-

-

-

10.0

Graduation Rate (NCLB) (%)

-

71.6

85.6

90.0

Event Dropout (%)

-

1.7

3.3

5.0

Completion Rate (%)

-

-

***

90.0

*** Under Revision

 

 

 

 

 

 ( * ) = Data suppressed due to student N count

( - ) = Not Applicable or Not Available

( >95 ) = Result is >95%

( <5 ) = Result is <5%

 

 

Census Data 2000 (38555/38571 zip code)
                                               

Level of Education

                                                                        High School Diploma                College
            Stone Memorial                                                NA                              NA
            Cumberland County                                          66%                             34%
           
 
 

Average income or economic level

            Average Household Income – $30,901
            Median Household Income – $35,928
            Per Capita Income – $16,808
            Families below the Poverty Level – 11.8%
            Individuals below the Poverty Level –17.0%

 

Community Characteristics

Size Cumberland County

Population

51,045

Male

24,808

Female

26,237

Demographic Breakdown of the Populous

Median Age

42.5

White

98.1%

Other

1.9%

Some 20.5% of the population is over age 65 in 2000 and this level will almost surely continue to rise.  The relatively percentage of elderly and the relatively high median age are directly related to the county’s widely recognized status as a retirement center.  This trend is most dramatically shown in the 57.4% increase in the elderly (65+) population between 1990 and 2000.

 

 

                       
Number of private schools in the area

            Three private schools are located within the Crossville area.

Major employment sectors

Cumberland County Employment

Business Type

 

Employment

 

Percentage (%)

Natural Resources/Construction/Mining

 

1,180

 

7.2

Trade/Transportation/Utilities

 

3,760

 

23.1

Manufacturing

 

2,370

 

14.5

Finance/Insurance/Real Estate

 

450

 

2.8

Professional/Business Services

 

940

 

5.8

Education/Health Services

 

2,490

 

15.3

Leisure/Hospitality

 

2,430

 

14.9

Government

 

1,890

 

11.9

Other Service

 

460

 

2.8

TOTALS

 

16,310

 

100.0%

Community involvement or participation in school activities
                       
PTS0                                                   Family Friendly Center
Mentors                                               Athletic Booster Clubs
JROTC Booster                                   Band Booster
Choral Booster                         Leadership Team Membership
Community Engagement Facilitator Activities
Construction Academy             Stone Memorial Education Committee
First National Bank of Tennessee          Dave Kirk
Tap Publishing                          Big Boy’s BBQ
Flynn Sign                                            Mix 99.3 Peg Broadcasting
Cracker Barrel
Wynridge Health Systems
Jostens                                                 BP Travel Plaza-Genesis Rd.
Pilot                                                     Progressive Savings Bank
Tennessee Technology Center            Dr. Donald Hoowie
TAP Publishing                                   Cumberland Medical Center

 

 

School Characteristics

Historical background – Facilities

Stone Memorial High School is one of the newest high schools in Tennessee. SMHS opened on August 7, 2006.  As it opened, it became the second high school in Cumberland County.   The majority of students, faculty, and administration came from Cumberland County High School.  Stone Memorial is a “spawn” school that is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

There was no public high school in Cumberland County until 1908, when the County Court created a county high school.  The old courthouse, which had burned in 1905, was reconstructed to house the high school.   The female students and teachers used the Spring Lawn Hotel as a dormitory, and the male students stayed in private homes.  It was not until 1930, that a new county high school was constructed.   It was built of the native sandstone called Crab Orchard Stone.  The school was located on Highway 127S just blocks from downtown Crossville. 

Additional high schools were constructed beginning in 1938 in the Homestead Community and in 1947 when a building was purchased to open Pleasant Hill Academy.  In 1959, plans were made by the Cumberland County Board of Education to consolidate the three high schools.  The new Cumberland County High School would include grades 9-12.  In August 1962 students from all over the county opened the doors of a newly consolidated high school as the first classes to attend there.  That building is the present day Cumberland County High School, from which the student body was split to create Stone Memorial High School.

Celebrating more than 100 years of existence, Crossville was incorporated in 1901.
The beginnings of a community actually started many years before.

Prior to 1805, all of what is now Cumberland County was Indian Territory.  Arrowheads
found in the Burke community have been carbon dated to be thousands of years old.  The Indian mounds of this area have been studied at the University of Tennessee located in Chattanooga.

The oldest established community is Crab Orchard.  In 1797, Francis Bailey, son of an English banker, wrote of Crab Orchard:  “It is a fine, large plain, or natural meadow, containing may hundreds of acres and covered throughout its whole extent with a tall, rich grass surrounded on every side by the neighboring mountains and watered with several fine springs, which flow from one end to the other.”

Crossville was first known as Lambeth’s Cross Roads, because several key roads intersected here.  By the end of the 1800’s, the area was already being called Crossville and there were 15 or 20 homes nearby.

In 1855, Cumberland County was created.  The county seat was to be within five miles of the center of the county.  James Scott, proprietor of Scott’s Tavern (located where Mayberry’s Furniture stands today), offered to deed 40 acres of property to the new county if Crossville were named the county seat.  His offer was accepted.

The first county courthouse sat on the property near where the second courthouse, now celebrating its 114th birthday, presently stands.  Although it is no longer used as the county’s courthouse, it does house the county’s historical and military museum and is open to the public.   Both the historic and current courthouses, located across from one another on Main Street, have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

When Crossville was incorporated in 1901, it boasted a railroad and a depot, a newspaper, a hotel, a bank, several stores, a booming lumber and coal industry, and 99 people on the first tax roll.  Already a thriving community, the city has seen a history of prosperity and growth, including double digit increases in population in the last two censuses.

One of the oldest industries in Cumberland County is the limestone industry.  This operation has been in Crab Orchard since the turn of the century and thrives to this day.  Historic Crab Orchard was incorporated in 1973.

The Cumberland Homesteads project of the 1930’s was one of the most successful WPA projects of its kind in the New Deal Era.  It was a community designed to put workers to work in an effort to boost the depressed economy of the 1930’s.  Eleanor Roosevelt was instrumental in the development of (and actually visited) the Homesteads project.  The area has the distinction of being designated as a National Historic District.

Cumberland County comprises 679 square miles.  It is the fourth largest county in Tennessee.